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A few 'quick-facts' about each state's background

Click on the state bird below to view that state's quick-facts page

 

State Birds are commonly designated by each state's legislature. The selection of state birds began in 1927, when the legislatures for Alabama, Florida, Maine, Missouri, Oregon, Texas and Wyoming selected their state birds. Birds are important indicators of the overall health of our environment. Like the proverbial canaries in the coal mine, they send an urgent warning about threats to our water, air, natural resources, climate and more.

Northern flicker
Alabama
Northern Flicker
Hawaiian goose
Hawaii

Hawaiian Goose
Black-capped chickadee
Massachusetts
 
Black-Capped Chickadee
Roadrunner
New Mexico
Roadrunner
Ring-necked pheasant
South Dakota
Ring-Necked Pheasant

Willow Ptarmigan
Alaska
Willow Ptarmigan

Mountain bluebird
Idaho
Mountain Bluebird

American robin
Michigan
American Robin

Eastern bluebird
New York
Eastern Bluebird

Northern mockingbird
Tennessee
Northern Mockingbird

Cactus wren
Arizona
Cactus Wren

Northern cardinal
Illinois
Northern Cardinal

Common loon
Minnesota
Common Loon

Northern cardinal
North Carolina
Northern Cardinal

Northern mockingbird
Texas
Northern Mockingbird

Northern mockingbird
Arkansas
Northern Mockingbird

Northern cardinal
Indiana
Northern Cardinal

Northern mockingbird
Mississippi
Northern Mockingbird

Western meadowlark
North Dakota
Western Meadowlark

California gull
Utah
California Gull

California quail
California
California Quail

Eastern goldfinch
Iowa
Eastern Goldfinch

Eastern bluebird
Missouri
Eastern Bluebird

Northern cardinal
Ohio
Northern Cardinal

Hermit thrush
Vermont
Hermit Thrush

Lark bunting
Colorado
Lark Bunting

Western meadowlark
Kansas
Western Meadowlark

Western meadowlark
Montana
Western Meadowlark

Scissor-tailed flycatcher
Oklahoma
Scissor-Tailed Flycatcher

Northern cardinal
Virginia
Northern Cardinal

American robin
Connecticut
American Robin

Northern cardinal
Kentucky
Northern Cardinal

Western meadowlark
Nebraska
Western Meadowlark

Western meadowlark
Oregon
Western Meadowlark

Willow goldfinch
Washington
Willow Goldfinch

Delaware Blue Hen
Delaware
Blue Hen

Brown Pelican
Louisiana
Brown Pelican

Mountain bluebird
Nevada
Mountain Bluebird

Ruffed grouse
Pennsylvania
Ruffed Grouse

Northern cardinal
West Virginia
Northern Cardinal

Northern mockingbird
Florida
Northern Mockingbird

Black-capped chickadee
Maine
Black-Capped Chickadee

Purple finch
New Hampshire
Purple Finch

red chicken
Rhode Island
Red Chicken

American robin
Wisconsin
American Robin

Brown thrasher
Georgia
Brown Thrasher

Baltimore Oriole
Maryland
Baltimore Oriole

Eastern goldfinch
New Jersey
Eastern Goldfinch

Carolina wren
South Carolina
Carolina Wren

Western meadowlark
Wyoming
Western Meadowlark

State: a region of the United States that has its own government for some matters. Each state is a territorial division of America and elects members to congress to represent their state, forming a branch of the federal government. There are 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean.

   

A state of the United States of America is one of the 50 constituent political entities that share its sovereignty with the United States federal government. Because of the shared sovereignty between each U.S. state and the U.S. federal government, an American is a citizen of both the federal republic and of his or her state of domicile. State citizenship and residency are flexible and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons covered by certain types of court orders (e.g., paroled convicts and children of divorced spouses who are sharing custody).

The United States shares international land borders with two nations: The Canada United States border to the north and The Mexico United States border to the south.

In addition to the 50 states and federal district, the United States has control over 14 territories. Five of them (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands) have a permanent, nonmilitary population, while nine of them (the United States Minor Outlying Islands) do not.

With the exception of Navassa Island, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, which are located in the Caribbean, all territories are located in the Pacific Ocean. One territory, Palmyra Atoll, is considered to be incorporated, meaning the full body of the Constitution has been applied to it; the other territories are unincorporated, meaning the Constitution does not fully apply to them.

Ten territories (the Minor Outlying Islands and American Samoa) are considered to be unorganized, meaning they have not had an Organic Act enacted by Congress; the four other territories are organized, meaning they have had an Organic Act that has been enacted by Congress. The five inhabited territories each have limited autonomy in addition to having territorial legislatures and governors, but residents cannot vote in federal elections.




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